It is reasonable to say that a photographer’s style and choice of subjects can also depend on the emotional stimuli he or she was subjected to while growing up.

While I certainly love to portray beauty in my photos, whenever I am able to find it and see it, I think it would be honest for me to say that the majority of my subjects depict an array of painful, difficult, controversial, uncomfortable emotions and situations.

I realize that human pain, whether blatantly shouted or quietly whispered, is, and has always been, the strongest conceptual magnet attracting my camera lens.

Existential and psychological pain was always present in my life, since my earliest childhood. I was able to address and resolve some issues while growing up, others are still unresolved to this day, in the sunset of my life.

Living in New York City, I decided to embark in an attempt to visually explore the pain and the existential suffering I perceived, at many different levels, in the majority of people around me.

FIELD NOTES

Pain is a four-letter word.

Pain is probably the truest equalizer in our lives, regardless of our social, cultural or religious status.

We all experience pain, mental or physical, at some point in our lives.

Pain, in modern society has sometimes some implicit, unspoken connection, with shame.

We try drugs, meditation, psychotherapy, prayer, anesthesia and /or anything else to deal with pain or to avoid it altogether. Pain is scary.

The threshold or intensity of pain is not easily measurable; it is a subjective experience. The quality of pain and its manifestation is also very subjective.

Pain can be sudden, occasional or last a whole lifetime.

In modern society there is a fairly common denial of suffering. Mental suffering in particular is usually associated to instability, madness, to a stubbornly widespread mental health stigma. This leads to ostracize the sufferer as an unreliable, dangerous and a socially undesirable individual.

A lot of pain goes undetected; a lot more goes untold and unheard.

Inflicting pain onto others is a common technique to coerce and control.

Pain is sometimes associated with death but it is often feared more than death itself.
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